By Leon Gettler >>

HOW DO the big brands market themselves to millennials when the younger generation no longer watches TV or listens to radio?

They have to do it through social media. More particularly, they have to find so-called ‘influencers’ – users who have established a lot of credibility in a specific industry, have access to a huge audience, and who can persuade others to act based on their recommendations.

This is why Domenic Carosa set up CrowdMedia. Now based in Amsterdam, the Australian company, which is listed on the ASX, markets through technology — predominantly to millennials, predominantly using platforms like social media, including YouTube and Instagram.

“You only need to walk down the street these days to see that millennials specifically are spending more time staring into their mobile phones,” CrowdMedia CEO Domenic Carosa told Talking Business

“They’re on social media sites like YouTube, Facebook and Instagram and with that, there has been an increase in the number of what we call digital influencers.

“In effect, they’re creating a new type of TV channel, whether it’s involved in fashion, or news or sport. So millennials these days are consuming this content and getting entertained and learning new recommendations for products using social media.”

BRAND CONSCIOUS

CrowdMedia has worked with brands like L’Oreal and Nescafe, who are trying to target millennials, and the only way they can do that is through social media and influencers.

CrowdMedia has built technology around this, using artificial intelligence. It has created tools that allow it to identify the major influencers in the market place, how many followers they have, and their level of engagement with followers.

“We have built tools that help match the right influencer with the right brand and product because there are millions of influencers out there and so making sure we get that alignment right is absolutely critical for ourselves as well as our brands,” Mr Carosa said.

About two thirds of the CrowdMedia workforce are millennials, who are digital marketers and digital strategists, and managing them is quite a niche for Mr Carosa.

“Having a good working culture is obviously absolutely critical for our company,” he said.

He said millennials were partly motivated by money but by other things too.

CrowdMedia now runs training as part of its retention program. Once staff  become managers, CrowdMedia offers them a share option plan to become shareholders of the company. And, besides the right kind of training, he said millennials also wanted a flexible work environment.

‘”One way we’re able to retain people is by helping them and training them for their future,” Mr Carosa said.

www.crowdmedia.com.au

www.leongettler.com 

Hear the complete interview and catch up with other topical business news on Leon Gettler’s Talking Business podcast, released every Friday at www.acast.com/talkingbusiness.  

ends

DAIS BRAND Strategy has appointed Michail Kowal as its new design director, based in its Fortitude Valley, Brisbane head office.

The appointment is part of the company’s moves to ‘re-engineer’ for sustainability and to continually enhance its client-centric creativity capabilities, as previously reported in Business Acumen.

“Michail brings over 20 years of brand creation and development experience to the DAIS team,” DAIS founder and director Jack Perlinski said.

“Having worked on a diverse range of brands both nationally and internationally, Michail utilises his passion for branding and design to create, grow and nurture new and existing brands. 

“A strategic thinker with a collaborative, hands-on creative approach, Michail will be leading the DAIS design team and working to deliver the best results for our clients,” Mr Perlinksi said.

“The whole team is excited to have Michail joining us and we can’t wait to see what he contributes to our projects.”

Some of the brands DAIS has helped develop include Emporium Hotels, Clovely Estate Wines, Hema Maps, Vision 6, Queensland Leaders and International Leaders.

www.dais.com.au

By Sabri Suby >>

MANY BUSINESSES go headfirst into ‘selling’ to potential customers at the first chance, which is just like asking a stranger to marry you.

Here is a proven strategy to turn more cold leads into warm, receptive potential customers:

 

Targeting the non-buying customer

Typically, only 3 percent of the market are actively buying, and all your competitors are already targeting them. By targeting the 97 percent of the market that are not yet active buyers you will be building a pipeline of untouched future customers.

 

Would you ask a stranger to marry you?

With advertising, the majority of the people that you're going to be advertising to don't know, like, or trust you – what we call ‘cold tinder traffic’. They’ve just Googled a search like ‘accountant Melbourne’. 

This is where 99 percent of businesses get it wrong. They approach their prospects with a full frontal assault.

No wining and no dining! They are walking into a bar and asking a stranger to marry them!

Businesses need to understand their ideal client. This goes beyond the usual demographics such as age and gender, you need to know what they think, feel, and what makes them tick.

Don’t expect someone to browse your website for two to three minutes and then make a purchase. You can’t expect to convert more than 1-5 percent of your leads unless you build trust first.

 

Offer value before you push your service

You need to effectively buy your potential customer a free drink – through knowing them and knowing what questions they are asking.

Then you can offer value.

Our proven method is to use e-books and free reports to package up a valuable piece of content and then give it to your potential customers to further educate them along their journey. You are giving them value well in advance before ever trying to move on to the sales conversation.

For example, ‘What are the 10 things I should take when I meet a new accountant?’ or ‘What are the three things you should ask a house builder?’.

This free value changes the dynamic between the potential client and your company – they get to know you and trust begins to build.

But don’t forget that your emails, reports and offers need to be 80 percent value and 20 percent pitch, so include a call to action. Anyone who exchanges their details for the report becomes a warm lead that you can then nurture.

 

Maximise your website

Don’t link your digital marketing to your home page. Leads will drop off as they do not immediately find what they are looking for.

Each report or marketing tool should go to a page that specifically answers the questions in the e-book or report so it addresses the potential customer’s needs.

Let the prospect get to know you. Tell them about how the business started, about the founder, why the company does what it does.

Don’t just brag about how great you are.

 

Nurture your prospect

You are building a relationship through regular, informative contact. You are answering your potential customer’s questions and building trust.

Then you can move to the next step which may be a free consultation. You are still offering value but you are taking the client on a ‘second date’.

The relationship can then develop all the way through to what we call ‘Netflix and chill’.

 

Convert

Once you have stood out through providing value, building trust and being an advocate for your customers you have already demonstrated to them where they should go when they are ready to buy. They understand your company and feel secure in purchasing from you.

Through these strategies you have the best chance of securing a satisfied, paying customer.

www.kingkong.com.au

Sabri Suby is the founder of Australia’s fastest growing digital marketing agency, King Kong, and author of Sell Like Crazy. The book covers all facets of digital marketing and illustrates the path to success with real-life case studies where Sabri has used the exact same selling system to supercharge their business. Find out more at www.kingkong.com.au

By Ellen Boonstra, Asia correspondent >>

THE HEARTBREAKING IMAGE of a two-year old Honduran girl crying near the US-Mexico border, while her mother is being searched and detained, made headlines around the world as the face of President Donald Trump's ‘zero tolerance’ immigration policy last year.

Taken by Getty photographer and Pulitzer Prize-winner John Moore, it won this year’s World Press Photo of the Year award. 

The image is part of the traveling World Press Photo 2019 exhibition which is making its way to Brisbane, where it will be on display at the Brisbane Powerhouse from July 13 to August 4.

Celebrating the best in photojournalism, the exhibition is a reflection of the most talked about news events of the past year, featuring over 150 single images and photo stories captured by professional photographers from across the globe.

The first World Press Photo award, back in 1955, came about when members of the Dutch photojournalists’ union had the idea of turning a national competition into an international one. What began as a one-off event has been held almost every year since, with the winning pictures put together in a traveling exhibition.

From these humble beginnings in The Netherlands with just a few hundred submissions, the event has flourished into what is widely regarded as the industry equivalent of the Oscars, with this year nearly 80,000 entries and 110 exhibitions in 45 countries, seen by over four million people.

The event earlier this year in Amsterdam where the winners were announced, was a weeklong festival with a dynamic program of master classes, presentations, screenings, meet-ups and panel discussions.

Business Acumen spoke with managing director Lars Boering at the organisation’s new premises at Amsterdam’s Westergasfabriek to get the bigger picture and find out how World Press Photo has evolved over the years.

“We are more than a contest,” he said, explaining how the World Press Photo Foundation plays an important role in bringing visual storytelling to places where media censorship is rife. 

Using the Press Freedom Index as a compass, they are guided to destinations where they feel they can make an impact. This year’s plans include “mission-driven” exhibitions to El Salvador, Caracas and Baghdad, among others.

“We highlight the importance of freedom of speech, freedom of exchange of information and free flow of information. Our dream is to touch every country of the world – whether it’s with the exhibition or an activity, or just by being there.”

 

WIDE OUTREACH

For two years in a row, the organisation has held exhibitions at the Yangon Photo Festival in Myanmar.

“In a country that’s not so open about press freedom, that’s something very special,” he said, adding that the organisation makes sure to maintain its neutrality. “We have one rule – we do not alter the content of the annual exhibition for political reasons.”

Also, in an era where large parts of the population have become immune to yet another news report showing poverty, misery and atrocities, the organisation feels a responsibility towards encouraging journalists to document more positive news stories – ones that focus on what’s actually working rather than on what’s gone wrong.

“If you have stories that are positioned to talk about great things, with emphatic things taking place, then that’s the most powerful antidote to negativity and fake news,” he surmised.

Case in point is the ‘Solutions Visual Journalism Initiative’, a groundbreaking project launched at World Press Photo this year, in collaboration with the New York Times.

Solutions or constructive journalism aims to change the frame of the story to address “the negativity bias” in the media, switching from a focus on problems to stories of those taking action. 

While this type of journalism has been growing in recent years, it has not yet been comprehensively or consciously adopted by documentary photographers, photojournalists and other visual journalists.

World Press Photo Foundation plans to commission, fund and publish a small number of such news stories in 2019-2020 in order to educate journalists and engage the public on the benefits of a solutions focus in visual journalism and the media’s “negativity bias.”

“Bad news is numbing for people,” Mr Boering said.

“My organisation has been involved with showing bad news for years; how great is it to make photographers aware that they can submit work that shows things that are moving in the right direction?” he says.

“The ‘Solutions’ type of project is definitely something that we will pursue more of in the future.”

 

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

With a small, highly dedicated team of around 30 people at the Amsterdam headquarters and a large number of international volunteers in locations around the world, the organisation has managed to put together an impressive roster of photojournalism-related exhibitions, activities and initiatives.

World Press Photo Foundation is primarily funded by its own activities, accounting for about 60 percent of its revenue. There are corporate partnerships – in Holland PriceWaterhouseCoopers and Dutch Postcode Lottery are major sponsors this year, while the exhibitions in Sydney and Brisbane are supported by Canon Australia and Brisbane Airport Corporation, respectively.

The organisation also receives funding from private donors and family foundations, as well as support from embassies, museums and art institutions. Combined with revenue derived from renting out the exhibition worldwide and other activities like the sales of the World Press Photo yearbooks, Mr Boering estimated current annual turnover to be between 3.5 and 5 million euros.

“We are a non-profit social enterprise and aggregate as much money as we can to spend it on creating impact,” Mr Boering said.

The social impact is on multiple levels. Just by announcing the winners alone, the organisation has a potential global reach of 4.3 billion views through all the media coverage that is generated as a result of the exhibition and the organisation’s many other activities, “meaning all these people get touched by stories that matter".

At a time when journalism including photojournalism is under pressure, he said, “it is important to offer them [journalists and photographers] a platform because at the end of the day, they are preserving a piece of history as well as shaping the way news and photojournalism are reported.” 

 

World Press Photo Exhibition 2019

13 July 2019 to 4 August 2019

Brisbane Powerhouse, Brisbane

Free admission

 

www.worldpressphoto.org

www.brisbanepowerhouse.org/events/2019/07/12/world-press-photo-exhibition-2019

ends

By Stella Gianotto >>

ONCE available only to large corporations, branding is now more accessible and vitally important to every size – and type – of family business, including yours.

But what is branding and how does it contribute to your business’s success?

Branding achieves considerably more than a clever name or a slick logo does.

Think of iconic Australian brand Akubra, which has been making wide brimmed hats for over 130 years. It is a little known fact that the Akubra name is “believed to be derived from an Aboriginal word for head covering” according to Wikipedia. 

It is more ingrained than a catchy tag line, such as the one that Walter Kennard (aka Wally) from Kennards Hire said back in 1948, “I won't lend it to you, but I'll hire it to you.”

And it’s even more enduring than your latest advertisement or marketing campaign, such Sandhurst Fine Foods radio commercial, where CEO Mimmo Lubrano tells Maria to “put down the artichokes…”

Branding doesn’t replace these important business development or marketing strategies, especially ones that have become part of the Australian business landscape.

Branding inspires them, it focuses the strategy, gives it purpose – AND it gives it a long-term impact.

Branding is the driving force behind WHY consumers purchase your product when there are many competitors or overseas knock-offs available to them. The top-of-mind recall, known as ‘brand awareness’ inspires your customers to buy your product, with just a little extra push.

WHEN DOES BRANDING START?

Whether you realised it or not, your brand was established from the day you started your family business.

In many cases, the brand remains hidden and ineffective. Once revealed and used, a brand can breathe new life into the business, the family and the business owners.

It’s never too late to brand or even re-brand your family owned business. Big businesses do it regularly as their market and competition change.

We’ve all tasted one of the brewed soft drinks from Bundaberg Brewed Drinks (family owned since 1960) whose CEO, John McLean was quoted as saying, “Once we took the time and didn’t have to talk about someone else’s brand … we were able to grow our brand and take our business further and further afield,”

This is part of the reason they are a global business and today export to over 32 countries.

Small businesses can, and should, consider undergoing a branding exercise as part of any major investment, such as redesigning marketing and sales materials, or for an advertising or social media marketing campaign.

In addition to improving the initial response to your initiative, a brand will create a lasting impression on the marketplace, for both current as well as potential customers.

For Bundaberg Brewed Drinks, part of their re-brand was to focus on their core offering and what they did well: “brewing ginger beer in that familiar stubby bottle”.

In turn, this will improve long-term sales and recognition.

And unlike many promotions, sales efforts won’t have to rely on lower prices and reductions in profit margins to gain more market share either locally or abroad, in an attempt to increase your brand awareness.

ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING A BRAND

As with most marketing activities, branding is a specialty skill that every family business should pursue diligently.

Family businesses (in particular) should be attentive to branding strategies – according to Forbes magazine, “family-owned businesses seem more stable, more customer-friendly, more approachable and more trustworthy”. The Forbes article goes on further to say that “even the appearance of a family connection increases market visibility and consumer trust” for any family-owned brand.

Once you are able to understand this concept, you (and your family business) are ready to dive into the world of branding.

The best introduction to this great marketing strategy should come from a branding expert who will help you get to the heart and soul of your business and articulate its hidden brand message.

Once revealed, your enticing brand message will resonate with your target market and will distinctly differentiate your product from your competitors.

Investing in your branding right from the outset, with a branding expert, will see your next stage of business growth resulting in dividends accruing quickly and continuously, and potentially global expansion ahead too. 

About the author

Brand For Brands founder Stella Gianotto specialises in branding and is passionate about making branding accessible and understandable for her clients and for industry audiences. A series of industry awards and presence has led to her contributing to several books: Marketing Brands Made Easy, Social Media Marketing: Write Up Your Tweet and Well Spun: Big PR and Social Media Ideas for Small Business.

www.brandforbrands.com/stella-gianotto

By Ellen Boonstra, Asia correspondent >>

THE PRESTIGIOUS World Press Photo 2019 exhibition is now on at the State Library in Sydney where it will be on display until June 23. Afterwards, the exhibition travels to Brisbane, where it will be on show from July 13 to August 4.

Celebrating the best in photojournalism, the exhibition is a reflection of the most talked about news events of the past year, featuring over 150 single images and photo stories captured by professional photographers from across the globe.

The first World Press Photo award, back in 1955, came about when members of the Dutch photojournalists’ union had the idea of turning a national competition into an international one. What began as a one-off event has been held almost every year since, with the winning pictures put together in a travelling exhibition. 

From these humble beginnings in The Netherlands with just a few hundred submissions, the event has flourished into what is widely regarded as the photojournalism industry equivalent of the Oscars. This year there were nearly 80,000 entries and 110 exhibitions in 45 countries, seen by over four million people.

Last month’s event in Amsterdam where the winners were announced, was a weeklong festival with a dynamic program of master classes, presentations, screenings, meet-ups and panel discussions.

Business Acumen spoke with managing director Lars Boering at the organisation’s new premises at Amsterdam’s Westergasfabriek to get the bigger picture and find out how World Press Photo has evolved over the years.

“We are more than a contest,” he said, explaining how the World Press Photo Foundation plays an important role in bringing visual storytelling to places where media censorship is rife. 

Using the Press Freedom Index as a compass, they are guided to destinations where they feel they can make an impact. This year’s plans include ‘mission-driven’ exhibitions to El Salvador, Caracas and Baghdad, among others.

“We highlight the importance of freedom of speech, freedom of exchange of information and free flow of information,” Mr Boering said. “Our dream is to touch every country of the world – whether it’s with the exhibition or an activity, or just by being there.”

WIDE OUTREACH

For two years in a row, the organisation has held exhibitions at the Yangon Photo Festival in Myanmar.

“In a country that’s not so open about press freedom, that’s something very special,” he said, adding that the organisation makes sure to maintain its neutrality. 

“We have one rule – we do not alter the content of the annual exhibition for political reasons.”

Also, in an era where large parts of the population have become immune to yet another news report showing poverty, misery and atrocities, the organisation feels a responsibility towards encouraging journalists to document more positive news stories – ones that focus on what’s actually working rather than on what’s gone wrong.

“If you have stories that are positioned to talk about great things, with emphatic things taking place, then that’s the most powerful antidote to negativity and fake news,” Mr Boering surmised.

Case in point is the ‘Solutions Visual Journalism Initiative’, a groundbreaking project launched at World Press Photo this year, in collaboration with the New York Times.

Solutions or constructive journalism aims to change the frame of the story to address “the negativity bias” in the media, switching from a focus on problems to stories of those taking action. 

While this type of journalism has been growing in recent years, it has not yet been comprehensively or consciously adopted by documentary photographers, photojournalists and other visual journalists.

World Press Photo Foundation plans to commission, fund and publish a small number of such news stories in 2019-2020 in order to educate journalists and engage the public on the benefits of a solutions focus in visual journalism and the media’s ‘negativity bias’.

“Bad news is numbing for people,” Mr Boering said.

“My organisation has been involved with showing bad news for years; how great is it to make photographers aware that they can submit work that shows things that are moving in the right direction?” he said.

“The ‘Solutions’ type of project is definitely something that we will pursue more of in the future.”

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

With a small, highly dedicated team of around 30 people at the Amsterdam headquarters and a large number of international volunteers in locations around the world, the organisation has managed to put together an impressive roster of photojournalism-related exhibitions, activities and initiatives.

World Press Photo Foundation is primarily funded by its own activities, accounting for about 60 percent of its revenue.

There are corporate partnerships – in Holland PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and Dutch Postcode Lottery are major sponsors this year, while the exhibitions in Sydney and Brisbane are supported by Canon Australia and Brisbane Airport Corporation, respectively.

The organisation also receives funding from private donors and family foundations, as well as support from embassies, museums and art institutions. Combined with revenue derived from renting out the exhibition worldwide and other activities like the sales of the World Press Photo yearbooks, Mr Boering estimated current annual turnover to be between 3.5 and 5 million euros. 

“We are a non-profit social enterprise and aggregate as much money as we can to spend it on creating impact,” Mr Boering said.

The social impact is on multiple levels. Just by announcing the winners alone, the organisation has a potential global reach of 4.3 billion views through all the media coverage that is generated as a result of the exhibition and the organisation’s many other activities, “meaning all these people get touched by stories that matter”.

At a time when journalism including photojournalism is under pressure, Mr Boering said, “it is important to offer them [journalists and photographers] a platform because at the end of the day, they are preserving a piece of history as well as shaping the way news and photojournalism are reported.”

World Press Photo Exhibition 2019

Ends June 23, 2019

State Library of NSW, Sydney

Free admission.

 

July 13 to August 4, 2019

Brisbane Powerhouse, Brisbane

Free admission.

www.worldpressphoto.org

By Leon Gettler >>

WITH 40 percent of jobs set to disappear over the 15 years as a result of artificial intelligence (AI) and automation, people will need to brand themselves, according to Scarlett Vespa.

A self-styled personal branding expert who calls herself the ‘Human Brand Futurist’, she said people needed to be several steps ahead of the inevitable changes.

“As the pressure builds in every industry and anxiety and different mental health issues come up, we really need to know who we are and why we’re doing it and that will become much more prevalent,” Ms Vespa told Talking Business

She said coaching was now a growth industry because people needed support in the changing climate out there.

Ms Vespa said the first thing people should do is future proof themselves by building their best self and being super-aware of what’s happening in their industry.

“The other tip is to really focus on your own personal growth and get some strength and confidence,” she said.

Ms Vespa said this was particularly important for people who are over 40 and 50 and who are finding it hard to get a job in their age bracket.

What they need instead is a change of mindset where they see themselves standing out in the job market by offering skills and experience, she said.

It’s also important for people to take a look at their skills and talents and reframing them, seeing how they can be applied differently.

Ms Vespa said people also need a brand on social media – including having their own website.

“I am very much for people buying their URL, their own name, because businesses come and go but you’ll stay there,” she said.

It is a way for people to showcase their skills. 

www.leongettler.com

Hear the complete interview and catch up with other topical business news on Leon Gettler’s Talking Business podcast, released every Friday at www.acast.com/talkingbusiness.

ends

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