BRISBANE’s metropolitan airport, Archerfield, has been awarded the Corporate Project of the Year award by the Australian Airports Association (AAA) for its airspace optimisation project.

The AAA award recognises project innovation that provides major benefits to an airport’s operations. The Archerfield Airspace Optimisation Project was instigated by the management team at Archerfield Airport Corporation (AAC) and Keith Tonkin of Aviation Projects, who was engaged by AAC to implement the various project phases.
 
The project involved significant upgrading of the airport’s airspace and flight procedures, enabling more efficient and safer operation of all aircraft up to performance category C, flying at up to 140 knots.   
AAC general manager, Heather Mattes said the improvements would ensure that AAC meets increasing demand from operators of the larger, higher performance aircraft that currently operate from the airport.

“Archerfield Airport will be able to support aircraft operations under instrument meteorological conditions, 24 hours a day, before and after the commissioning of Brisbane Airport’s new parallel runway,” Ms Mattes said. “Improvements completed to date include new straight-in instrument approaches to runway 10L for up to performance category C aircraft, less restrictive standard instrument departure ceiling and visibility requirements, adding a broadcast capability to the automatic weather station and a webcam that live streams the current weather situation at the airport.”

Ms Mattes said the project continues to be rolled out in 2018.

New initiatives include optimising the existing approach to runway 28R; upgrading the approach to runway 10L for use by performance category C aircraft; implementing and protecting category C circling areas; introducing Baro-VNAV approaches to runway 10L/28R – due for flight validation in February – and measures such as reducing airport obstacles and protection of the airspace.

THE A³ arm of Airbus has completed a series of full-scale test flights by its all-electric, self-piloted vertical take-off and landing aircraft, named Vahana.

 Vahana, as reported by A³ by Airbus, reached a height of 5m before descending safely at the Pendleton UAS Range in Oregon. Its first flight, with a duration of 53 seconds, was self-piloted and the vehicle completed a second flight the following day.

The aircraft is Airbus’s innovative approach to future urban air mobility.

“Today we are celebrating a great accomplishment in aerospace innovation,” Vahana project executive Zach Lovering said. 

“In just under two years, Vahana took a concept sketch on a napkin and built a full-scale, self-piloted aircraft that has successfully completed its first flight. Our team is grateful for the support we’ve received from A³ and the extended Airbus family, as well as our partners including MTSI and the Pendleton UAS Range.”

The Vahana project is being developed at , the Silicon Valley innovation outpost of Airbus Industrie. Vahana aims to ‘democratise’ personal flight and answer the growing need for urban mobility by leveraging the latest technologies in electric propulsion, energy storage, and machine vision, according to Airbus reports.

“Vahana’s first flight demonstrates Airbus’ unique ability to pursue ambitious ideas quickly, without compromising the quality and safety for which the company is well-known,” A³ CEO and former project executive of Vahana, Rodin Lyasoff said. “For A³, it proves that we can deliver meaningful innovation with aggressive project timetables, to provide a real competitive advantage for Airbus.

“Our focus now is on celebrating the work of the tireless Vahana team while maintaining the momentum of this accomplishment.”

Founded in May 2015, A³ (pronounced ‘A-cubed’) is the advanced projects outpost of Airbus in Silicon Valley.  Mr Lyasoff said A³ concentrated on projects “centred around three traits: speed, transparency and a commitment to culminating in productisable demonstrators or demonstrators at convincing scale”.

www.vahana.aero

ends

AIR SERVICES Australia is preparing to install supporting infrastructure and equipment at Brisbane Airport to enable the operation of the new second runway under construction.

New aviation navigation system equipment and aviation rescue firefighting services are required to support the introduction of the new runway, an Air Services Australia spoksesperson said. 

Additional airfield equipment and infrastructure is set for installation, including navigational aids at each end of the new runway and a new fibre optic network. Civil works proposed in this project will support these installations.

Additionally a new Aviation Rescue Fire Fighting Service will be constructed to support the new runway.

The project is scheduled to be completed in line with the new runway being operational in 2020. The estimated cost of the project is $24.92 million.

The Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works conducted public and in-camera hearings and took submissions in November.

www.aph.gov.au/pwc

ends

CASA’s blueprint for the future

A FRESH blueprint for the future of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) has been released by the Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Darren Chester. It places a new emphasis on the way CASA delivers client services and drive a ‘digital-first’ approach to medical certification.

Mr Chester said CASA’s latest corporate plan continues the authority’s focus on safety as its highest priority. But the blueprint also sets out how the nation's aviation safety regulator “will be pragmatic, practical and proportional in its responsibilities”. 

“The 2017–18 CASA corporate plan is a strong blueprint for the future of aviation safety regulation in Australia to help maintain our record of having one of the safest skies in the world,” Mr Chester said. “In addition to its regulatory approach the plan identifies a number of key aviation activities and highlights strong stakeholder engagement as a priority.

“CASA will maintain and enhance a fair, effective and efficient aviation safety regulation system while collaboratively engaging with the wider aviation community to promote and support a positive safety culture. CASA will also continually improve its organisational performance.

“I am particularly pleased to see CASA is committed to modernising its service delivery to meet the evolving needs of all sectors of Australian aviation. In 2017–18 CASA will develop a customer service charter that will shape the way it delivers client services.

“It will optimise client service channel options and will drive a digital first approach to medical certification. The overarching objective will be to create an efficient, simple and accessible experience for the people and organisations in aviation that conduct regulatory business with CASA,” Mr Chester said.

Other initiatives in the latest CASA corporate plan include a review of the safety regulatory strategy for remotely piloted aircraft systems, commencing implementation of the final tranche of regulatory reform, and continuing the implementation of the government's response to the Aviation Safety Regulatory Review.

www.casa.gov.au/publication/corporate-plan-2017–18

ends

DRONES flown near an Easter egg hunt and a wedding have cost their pilots hundreds of dollars in fines from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), for breaching Australia’s drone safety rules.

Another drone pilot has also been fined $1440 for flying in Sydney Harbour restricted airspace and flying within 30m of people. All three drones were being flown for recreational purposes.

The Civil Aviation Safety Regulations set out the drone rules and associated penalties. 

A group of children at a Canberra Easter egg hunt were put at risk by a drone flown at a height from which, if the drone malfunctioned, it would not have been able to clear the area. The drone pilot was fined $900.

A $900 fine was also issued for hazardous flying at and near guests at a wedding in regional NSW. All three drone pilots paid the penalties issued by CASA.

CASA director of aviation safety, Shane Carmody, said fines would continue to be issued where people broke the drone safety rules.

“The rules protect people, property and aircraft from drones,” Mr Carmody said. “If you fly a drone it is your responsibility to fly by the rules and stay safe at all times.

“Every drone pilot should download CASA’s drone safety app, which will help them fly safely.”

www.casa.gov.au/dronesapp

ends

CASA’s blueprint for the future

A FRESH blueprint for the future of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) has been released by the Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Darren Chester. It places a new emphasis on the way CASA delivers client services and drive a ‘digital-first’ approach to medical certification.

Mr Chester said CASA’s latest corporate plan continues the authority’s focus on safety as its highest priority. But the blueprint also sets out how the nation's aviation safety regulator “will be pragmatic, practical and proportional in its responsibilities”. 

“The 2017–18 CASA corporate plan is a strong blueprint for the future of aviation safety regulation in Australia to help maintain our record of having one of the safest skies in the world,” Mr Chester said. “In addition to its regulatory approach the plan identifies a number of key aviation activities and highlights strong stakeholder engagement as a priority.

“CASA will maintain and enhance a fair, effective and efficient aviation safety regulation system while collaboratively engaging with the wider aviation community to promote and support a positive safety culture. CASA will also continually improve its organisational performance.

“I am particularly pleased to see CASA is committed to modernising its service delivery to meet the evolving needs of all sectors of Australian aviation. In 2017–18 CASA will develop a customer service charter that will shape the way it delivers client services.

“It will optimise client service channel options and will drive a digital first approach to medical certification. The overarching objective will be to create an efficient, simple and accessible experience for the people and organisations in aviation that conduct regulatory business with CASA,” Mr Chester said.

Other initiatives in the latest CASA corporate plan include a review of the safety regulatory strategy for remotely piloted aircraft systems, commencing implementation of the final tranche of regulatory reform, and continuing the implementation of the government's response to the Aviation Safety Regulatory Review.

www.casa.gov.au/publication/corporate-plan-2017–18

ends

airlines-feature-img.jpg

MALAYSIA Airlines has good reason to welcome its new fleet-wide global tracking system developed by international aviation telecommunications specialist SITA.

Malaysia Airlines is the first carrier to adopt SITA’s real-time, space-based alerting system for flight tracking that combines SITAOnAir, Aireon and FlightAware products.

Continue reading

Contact Us

 

PO Box 2144
MANSFIELD QLD 4122